Alan A. Aderem, Ph.D.

Alan A. Aderem, Ph.D.

Affiliate Professor, Immunology and Medicine; Co-founder, Institute for Systems Biology; Director and Member, Seattle Biomedical Research Institute

Dr. Aderem received his Ph.D. in 1979 from the University of Cape Town, South Africa, and joined the faculty of the Rockefeller University, New York, in 1982. In 1991 he was appointed head of the Laboratory of Signal Transduction at the Rockefeller University. He joined the Department of Immunology at the University of Washington in 1996.  In 2000, Dr. Aderem co-founded the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) with Drs. Leroy Hood and Ruedi Aebersold.  In 2011, Aderem joined Seattle Biomedical Research Institute (Seattle BioMed) as director, and he will become Seattle BioMed president in 2012.  Working alongside Seattle BioMed's Founder and current President Dr. Ken Stuart, Dr. Aderem is integrating a systems biology approach to Seattle BioMed's global infectious disease research, positioning Seattle BioMed as the only institute in the world with infectious disease research and systems biology fully integrated in one building.

Contact Info

Seattle Biomedical Research Institute
307 Westlake Avenue N., Suite 500
Seattle, WA 98109-5219
Phone: 206-256-7333
Fax: 206-256-7229

Research Areas

  • Adaptive Immune Responses
    Innate Immunity

LAB

Aderem Lab at SeattleBiomed

Pubmed

Alan Aderem on PubMed

Aderem is an internationally recognized immunologist and cell biologist whose research focus is on the innate immune system - how it recognizes and formulates responses to infectious agents, and how it instructs the adaptive immune system to provide long-lived immunity to the pathogen.  His initial studies define how pattern recognition receptors, in particular the Toll-like receptors, identify bacteria and viruses - in essence, how the immune cell reads the molecular barcode of the infectious agent and, thereby, precisely defines the nature of the threat. This precise recognition triggers a specific, highly regulated response to the pathogen by the host.  A pioneer in the field of systems biology, Aderem is currently using these approaches of host-pathogen interaction to define these mechanisms and develop predictive, molecular models of immune and inflammatory responses.

Aderem is also applying the tools of systems biology to the study of diseases that significantly impact global health with an emphasis on the role of the innate immune system in vaccine response.  The Aderem Lab is focused on deciphering the role played by the innate immune response to HIV vaccination on the subsequent development of protective immunity.  Systems biology approaches are also used to evaluate vaccine candidates against HIV, Mtb, and plasmodium.  The Aderem Lab is also studying the host response to the influenza virus.  Specifically, the lab's research is focused on identifying mechanisms by which highly-pathogenic viruses can evade and often dysregulate the innate immune system.


The National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation provide support for Aderem's current research.

1.                  Gold ES, Ramsey SA, Sartain MJ, Selinummi J, Podolsky I, Rodriguez DJ, Moritz RL, Aderem A. 2012.  ATF3 protects against atherosclerosis by suppressing 25-hydroxycholesterol-induced lipid body formation.  J. Exp. Med. 209: 807-17. PMCID: 3328364

 

2.                  Negishi H, Yanai H, Nakajima A, Koshiba R, Atarashi K, Matsuda A, Matsuki K, Miki S, Doi T, Aderem A et al. 2012. Cross-interference of RLR and TLR signaling pathways modulates antibacterial T cell responses. Nat Immunol. 13(7): 659-66.

 

3.                  Sissons JR, Peschon JJ, Schmitz F, Suen R, Gilchrist M, Aderem A. 2012. Cutting edge: MicroRNA regulation of macrophage fusion into multinucleated giant cells. J Immunol. 189: 23-7.PMCID: 3381877.

 

4.                  Litvak V, Ratushny AV, Lampano AE, Schmitz F, Huang AC, Raman A, Rust AG, Bergthaler A, Aitchison DJ, Aderem A. 2012.A FOXO3-IRF7 gene regulatory circuit limits inflammatory sequelae of antiviral responses. Nature. 490:421-5. PMCID: 3556990

 

5.                  Nakayama M, Kurokawa K, Nakamura K, Lee BL, Sekimizu K, Kubagawa H, Hiramatsu K, Yagita H, Okumura K, Takai T, Underhill DM, Aderem A, Ogasawara K. 2012. Inhibitory receptor paired IG-like receptor B is exploited by Staphylococcus aureus for virulence. J Immunol. 189: 5903-11.

 

6.                  Zak DE, Andersen-Nissen E, Peterson ER, Sato A, Hamilton MK, Borgerding J, Krishnamurty AT, Chang JT, Adams DJ, Hensley TR, Salter AI, Morgan CA, Duerr AC, De Rosa SC, Aderem A, McElrath MJ. 2012. Merck Ad5/HIV induces broad innate immune activation that predicts CD8+ T-cell responses but is attenuated by preexisting Ad5 immunity. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 109: E3503-12. PMCID: 3528489

 

7.                  Rosenberger CM, Podyminogin RL, Navarro G, Zhao GW, Askovich PS, Weiss MJ, Aderem A. 2012. miR-451 regulated dendritic cell cytokine responses to influenza infection. J Immunol.189: 5965-75. PMCID: 3528339

 

8.                  Aachoui Y, Leaf IA, Hagar JA, Fontana MF, Campos CG, Zak DE, Tan MH, Cotter PA, Vance RE, Aderem A, Miao EA. 2013. Caspase-11 protects against bacteria that escape the vacuole. Science. 339:975-8. PMCID: 3697099

 

9.                  Tam VC, Quehenberger O, Oshansky CM, Suen R, Armando AM, Treuting PM, Thomas PG, Dennis EA, Aderem A. 2013. Lipidomic profiling of influenza infection identifies mediators that induce and resolve inflammation. Cell. 154:213-27. PMCID: In process.

 

10.                  Zak DE, Aderem A. 2012. Overcoming limitations in the systems vaccinology approach: A pathway for accelerated HIV vaccine development. Curr Opin HIV AIDS. 7: 58-63.

 

11.                  Aderem A, Czerkinsky C. 2012 June 12. Editorial overview. Curr Opin Immunol. [Epub ahead of print]

 

12.                  Diercks A, Aderem A. 2012 August 11. Systems approaches to dissecting immunity. Curr Top Microbiol Immunol. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Ph.D. University of Cape Town

Laboratory Members
Lynn Amon, lynn.amon@seattlebiomed.org
Peter Askovich, peter.askovich@seattlebiomed.org
Jackie Braun, jackie.braun@seattlebiomed.org
Thuy Dang, thuy.dang@seattlebiomed.org
Alan Diercks, alan.diercks@seattlebiomed.org
Drew Dover, drew.dover@seattlebiomed.org
Mark Gilchrist, mark.gilchrist@seattlebiomed.org
Mark Gillespie, mark.gillespie@seattlebiomed.org
Elizabeth Gold, elizabeth.gold@seattlebiomed.org
Ana Jahn, ana.jahn@seattlebiomed.org
Jarrod Johnson, jarrod.johnson@seattlebiomed.org
Shari Kaiser, shari.kaiser@seattlebiomed.org
Kathleen Kennedy, kathleen.kennedy@seattlebiomed.org
Irina Leaf, irina.leaf@seattlebiomed.org
Sasha Lucas, sasha.lucas@seattlebiomed.org
Dat Mai, dat.mai@seattlebiomed.org
Boniface Mailu, boniface.mailu@seattlebiomed.org
Alex Nachman, alex.nachman@seattlebiomed.org
Garnet Navarro, garnet.navarro@seattlebiomed.org
Irina Podolsky, irina.podolsky@seattlebiomed.org
Rebecca Podyminogin, rebecca.podyminogin@seattlebiomed.org
Frank Schmitz, frank.schmitz@seattlebiomed.org
Smitha Shankar, smitha.shankar@seattlebiomed.org
James Sissons, james.sissons@seattlebiomed.org
Stephanie Skelton, stephanie.skelton@seattlebiomed.org
Tetyana Stolyar, tetyana.stolyar@seattlebiomed.org
Rosa Suen, rosa.suen@seattlebiomed.org
Vincent Tam, vincent.tam@seattlebiomed.org
Ethan Thompson, ethan.thompson@seattlebiomed.org
Joe Valvo, joe.valvo@seattlebiomed.org
Mary Young, mary.young@seattlebiomed.org
Dan Zak, dan.zak@seattlebiomed.org
Ying Du, ying.du@seattlebiomed.org
Sarah Warren, sarah.warren@seattlebiomed.org